Centro de Bordados Cuenca

Centro de Bordados Cuenca

Hand-embroidery

Cuenca Embroidery and Artisanal Center is a cooperative where more than 24 women create handmade crafts, weaves, and embroideries.

  • The majority of us live in this community, outside the city. We are a group of people affected by the migration from the countryside to the City, as well as the migration from our country to the United States and Spain.
  • We are a group of women that sometimes play the role of mother and father for our kid’s education; and crafts, for us, are a way to work from our homes.
  • We rescue our cultural identity of the country; its flora and fauna translated them into our designs. We make products of excellence, we have got the UNESCO recognition.
  • We are the ones that embroidered Pope Francisco’s clothing during his mass ceremony in Quito.
 Piedad Ulloa

Piedad Ulloa

Ikat Weavings

I am from Bulcay-Gualaceo. I have been ikat weaving for around 43 years. I am the fifth generation, and my parents taught me this job. Ikat weaving is our tradition; It’s an ancestral job. We have had it for around 200 years, as my great-grandmother told me once.

  • I love what I do, I love that while living in the countryside I get to play with the plants and nature that God has given us.
  • We can guarantee the colors and designs that our clients want–we can do it.
Veronica Juwa

Veronica Juwa

Seed Beading

I come from the Amazon Rainforest. My work is all about Amazonian seeds. I design and make everything with my hands–from smallest to the largest. I have been beading jewelry from Tagua seeds since I was thirteen years old. The techniques came from our grandparents, and we keep these skills alive up until today by working.

  • Beading is also a way to make a living in my family. That is why I would like to ask you, from the bottom of my heart, to help us to export this crafts that came from the Amazon and that are made with our own hands and our hearts.
Jimenez Family

Jimenez Family

Ikat Weavings

We learned the art of weaving Makana with ikat technique from a very young age. In our culture, the Makana, or known as the shawl, is part of the traditional clothing of the indigenous women from Azuay province of Ecuador.

Jose, the householder of the family, is the only son of eleven brothers who learned this craft. Today, his works are recognized worldwide.

“I am the fourth generation of my family to work in this field, which I keep rescuing each procedure of the technique. Each step is executed by hand; we get our dyes from the nature of the Andes that surrounds our community, and we use them to dye yarns out of different fibers. Even though I love creating new designs and playing with colors, every day is a challenge for me.” –Jose Jimenez